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Monday, November 12, 2007

Letters: CBC rolled over to please China

The Gazette: Letter published: November 11, 2007

It's quite disturbing that CBC would yank a documentary on the Falun Gong after pressure from the Chinese embassy - but not surprising.

For CBC to be so acquiescent as to agree to re-edit the documentary to please China, especially after its final edit, speaks volumes. To show a rerun in its place on top of it all blows the CBC's cover.

It's bad enough that Beijing denies its persecution of the spiritual Falun Gong, but having the CBC go along and implement Beijing's censorship in our own free land is worse.

Will the new version reflect Beijing's justification for committing crimes against humanity and vilify the victims, as most totalitarian regimes do?

Somebody should remind the CBC that this is Canada.

Marie Beaulieu
Victoria

CBC is not credible or reliable
Letter
Published: 15 hours ago, Nov. 10, 2007

Re: "CBC delays Falun Gong film after Chinese protest" (Gazette, Nov. 8).

Editing films and documentaries right up to the last minute does happen in
television. What is extremely rare - and quite odd - is cancelling a
scheduled broadcast hours or even minutes before its advertised time. This
induces consumer, audience and stakeholder dissatisfaction and loss of
company sponsorship.

In cancelling Beyond the Red Wall, a film about the mistreatment of the
Falun Gong movement in China, the CBC has let down all of the above. Its
withdrawal also constitutes false advertising

The CBC is neither credible nor reliable.

Charmaine Millott, Victoria

Not a pretty picture
The Edmonton Journal
Published: 10 Nov. 2007

China wanted CBC to edit out two pieces of information. The first is the exposure of propaganda created by CBC's buddy, Xinghua (the media mouthpiece for the Chinese regime) and second is the fact that organs from living Falun Gong practitioners are the primary source of China's lucrative organ trade.

The Chinese Communist Party and many western business partners do not want anything to interfere with the hosting of the 2008 Olympics. Maybe if this film was shown in full, people might start to wake up and actually think about the value of putting principles before profits.

Sophia Bronwen, Vancouver


Who's running CBC?
The Edmonton Journal Published: 5:06 am, Nov. 10, 2007

Let me get this straight: The CBC backed Peter Rowe in making a documentary called Beyond the Red Wall; my CBC -- the CBC my taxes pay for.

It showed the film to the people of Spain, Portugal, New Zealand, Quebec and Ireland. But then, after a "polite" phone call from the Chinese embassy, my CBC decided I shouldn't see this film unless they -- ahem -- "edited it".

I am indignant. This is not China, but it soon will be if we allow the Chinese Communist Party to decide what we can see.

As a Canadian citizen, I request that my CBC make public the full content of the phone call from the Chinese embassy, and then immediately show us the original version of the film in prime time.

Kathy Gillis, Ottawa


Censorship lives
The Edmonton Journal
Published: 5:06 am, Nov. 10, 2007

Editing films and documentaries at the last minute before presentation does happen. What is extremely rare is cancelling the broadcast hours before its advertised time, since this induces consumer/audience/stakeholder dissatisfaction and loss of company sponsorship.

In cancelling Beyond the Red Wall, the CBC has shown itself to be neither accountable nor reliable.

Charmaine Millott, Victoria


When Beijing calls, the CBC jumps
The Edmonton Journal Published: 5:06 am, Nov. 10, 2007

Re: "CBC delays airing Falun Gong film: Chinese embassy raised concerns about documentary," The Journal, Nov. 8.

I find it disturbing, but not surprising, that CBC would yank a documentary on Falun Gong after pressure from the Chinese embassy.

For CBC to be so vulnerable as to re-edit the documentary to please China -- especially after it was a done deal, according to the producer -- speaks volumes. One wonders if we are in Canada or in China.

It's bad enough that Beijing denies its persecution of spiritual Falun Gong, without having CBC agree to censor the film in our own free land.

If the CBC has its way, chances are the new version of the film will reflect Beijing's justification for committing crimes against humanity and will vilify the victims, as most totalitarian regimes do.

Marie Beaulieu, Victoria


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